Luke Hambly

Luke Hambly is the Program Manager for the Centre for Democratic Institutions (CDI), housed by the Crawford School in the College of Asia and the Pacific at ANU. He has been with CDI since 2005 and prior to this, Luke worked within the discipline of Anthropology at ANU, including as research assistant to the Anthropology Department in the Research School of Pacific & Asian Studies (RSPAS), and as the inaugural course Coordinator of the Master of Applied Anthropology and Participatory Development (MAAPD) in the School of Archaeology and Anthropology. In 2004 Luke was awarded a Masters in Applied Anthropology and Participatory Development at ANU.

Luke was employed at AusAID between 1998 and 2000 working in a variety of areas within the agency, including the PNG branch, where in 2000 he was given the opportunity to work for 3 months with the Bougainville Peace Monitoring Group as a civilian monitor on the island of Buka. In 1999 he spent 3 months in Alice Springs working with the NT Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority assisting in the registration of sacred sites within the Northern Territory of Australia.

Political Parties in the Pacific Islands »

Edited by: Roland Rich, Luke Hambly, Michael G. Morgan
While political parties remain an indispensable institutional framework for representation and governance in a democracy, the democracies of many Pacific Islands nations are undermined by the weakness and inefficacy of their local political parties. Addressing the implications of the lack of established party systems across the Pacific, this collection seeks to illuminate the underlying assumptions and suppositions behind the importance of coherent and effective parties to overall democratic functioning. Focusing on the political systems of East Timor, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji and Samoa, the coherent structure of the volume makes it consistently useful as both an articulate analytical text and a reference tool concerning the political composition, history and direction of Pacific states. Featuring contributions from scholars who are familiar names to even the most casual of Pacificists, Political Parties in the Pacific is the benchmark reference work on the political parties of the Pacific: an invaluable resource for students, scholars and researchers of the Pacific and international politics.