Natasha Fijn

Natasha is a College of the Arts and Social Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellow at The Australian National University. Natasha’s research engages with the exciting subdisciplines of visual anthropology and human-animal studies. Her ongoing interest is in cross-cultural perceptions and attitudes toward other animals; as well as the use of multimedia, particularly observational filmmaking, as an integral part of her research.  Natasha is involved in teaching courses within the Masters of Visual Culture Research Program at the ANU.  Within her current research she is exploring the connections between Aboriginal Australians and culturally significant animals in northeast Arnhem Land.

 

Humanities Research Journal Series: Volume XVIII. No. 1. 2012 »

Perspectives on Ethnographic Film

Humanities Research is an internationally peer-reviewed journal published by the Research School of Humanities at The Australian National University. The Research School of Humanities came into existence in January 2007 and consists of the Humanities Research Centre, Centre for Cross-Cultural Research, National Europe Centre and Australian National Dictionary Centre. Launched in 1997, issues are thematic with guest editors and address important and timely topics across all branches of the humanities. This volume of Humanities Research features an enhanced epub: a downloadable ebook format with embedded video and audio files.

Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies II »

Historical engagements and current enterprises

This is the second volume to emerge from a project on Indigenous participation in the Australian economy, funded by an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant, and involving the cooperation of the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at The Australian National University and the National Museum of Australia. The Chief Investigators were Ian Keen, Chris Lloyd, Anthony Redmond, the Partner Investigator was Mike Pickering, Fiona Skyring was an associate researcher on the project, and Natasha Fijn was research assistant. The present volume arises out of a conference in Canberra on Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies at the National Museum of Australia on 9–10 November 2009, which attracted more than thirty presenters. The diverse themes included histories of economic relations, the role of camels and dingoes in Indigenous–settler relations, material culture and the economy, the economies of communities from missions and stations to fringe camps and towns, the transitions from payment-in-kind to wage economies and Community Development Employment Projects, the issue of unpaid and stolen wages, local enterprises, and conflicts over development. Sixteen of those papers have been developed as chapters in this volume, together with a foreword by Professor Jon Altman. This book comprises a companion volume to Indigenous Participation in Australian Economies: Historical and Anthropological Perspectives, published by ANU Press in 2010.